List of presidents of the Seventh Day Adventist Church from 1863 till date – Updated

List of presidents of the Seventh Day Adventist Church from 1863 till date – Updated

Updated – 2019.

The Seventh Day Adventist Church runs a democratic system of government which means decisions are made by elected committees through the vote of church members led by the Holy Spirit.

The organization consist of the following levels:

General Conference
Division
Union Conference/Mission
Conference/Mission
District
Local Church

A President is elected at the General Conference Session every 5 years and presides over the Executive Committee. Below is the list of G.C Presidents from 1863 till date with their respective pictures.

1. John Byington- He was the first president of the Seventh Day Adventist Church.
Country: United States
Duration: 1863-1865

List of Presidents Of The Seventh Day Adventist Church From 1863 Till Date

List of Presidents Of The Seventh Day Adventist Church From 1863 Till Date

2. James Springer White: He was also known as Elder J White and the husband of an Adventist pioneer, Author and prophetess – E.G White
Country: United State
Duration: 1865-1867

List of Presidents Of The Seventh Day Adventist Church From 1863 Till Date

List of Presidents Of The Seventh Day Adventist Church From 1863 Till Date

3. John N. Andrews -He was elected as the third president of the General Conference in 1867, following John Byington and James White.
Country: United States
Duration: 1867-1869

List of Presidents Of The Seventh Day Adventist Church From 1863 Till Date

4. James Springer White– He was re-elected as the president of Seventh Day Adventist church in 1869
Country: United States
Duration: 1869-1871

5. George I Butler- He replaced James White as president of the general conference in 1871
Country:United States
Duration: 1871-1874

6. James Springer White – He returned to the presidency in 1874 to becomes the 6th president of the Seventh Day Adventist Church.
Country: United States
Duration: 1874-1880

7. George I Butler: He resumed the office again in 1880
Country: United States
Duration: 1880-1888

8. Ole A. Oslen: The 1888 General Conference Session elected Olsen as president.
Country: Norway
Duration: 1888-1897

9. George A. Irwin: He was elected President of the General Conference at the General Conference session held in Lincoln, Nebraska
Country: United States.
Duration: 1897-1901

10. Arthur G. Daniells: He happened to be the longest serving president of the Seventh Day Adventist Church.
Country: United States
Duration: 1901-1922

11. Williams A. Spicer: With the experience acquired as General Conference Secretary, Spicer was elected as president of the Seventh Day Adventist Church during the 1922 General Conference session
Country: United States
Duration: 1922-1930

12. Charles H. Watson: From 1922- 1926, he served as vice-president and associate treasurer of the General Conference of Seventh-Day Adventist. He returned to North America in 1930 to attend the General Conference Session, where he was elected President of the General Conference
Country: Australia
Duration: 1930-1936

13. James L. McElhany
Duration: 1936-1950

14. William Henry Branson: He was elected as president of the Seventh Day Adventist Church in 1950.
Country: United States
Duration: 1950-1954

15. Reuben Richard Figuhr:15th President of the General Conference of the Seventh Day Adventist Church
Country: United States
Duration: 1954-1966

16. Robert H.Pierson: Pierson was the third-longest serving president of the General Conference of the Seventh Day Adventist Church
Country: United States
Duration: 1966-1979

17. Neal C.Wilson:
Country: United States
Duration: 1979-1990

 

18. Robert S Folkenberg:
Country: Puerto Rico
Duration: 1990-1999

19. Jan Paulsen: 19th President of the General Conference of Seventh day Adventist Church
Country:Norway
Duration: 1999-2010

List of Presidents Of The Seventh Day Adventist Church From 1863 Till Date

List of Presidents Of The Seventh Day Adventist Church From 1863 Till Date

20. Ted N.C. Wilson: He is the current president of the General Conference of the Seventh Day Adventist Church
Country: United States

Duration: 2010-2020

List of Adventist Institutions in Nigeria and Their Address updated

List of Presidents Of The Seventh Day Adventist Church From 1863 Till Date

List of Presidents Of The Seventh Day Adventist Church From 1863 Till Date

Seventh Day Adventist Church Calendar for 2019 (Details)

Seventh Day Adventist Church Calendar for 2019 (Details)

The Seventh Day Adventist Church is an organized denomination that runs almost the same program worldwide. They may live and worship in far-flung places, but the 19.1 million Seventh-day Adventists worldwide are not only a faith community—they’re a family.

But finding a sense of togetherness can be difficult. One way Adventists can promote community across time zones is by celebrating special emphasis days and events together. The Adventist Church’s calendar of Special Emphasis Days and Events not only encourages unity, it also helps raise awareness of key issues, such as abuse prevention, family and religious freedom.

Adventist Church leadership invites you and your church to join your global family in celebrating these emphasis days and events.

CALENDAR OF SPECIAL DAYS AND EVENTS – WORLD 2019

2019 SPECIAL DAYS/EVENTS

January 2019

January 5: Day of Prayer and Fasting – For more information, visit the Revival and Reformation website.

January 9–19: Ten Days of Prayer – For more information, visit the Ten Days of Prayer website.

January 12: Health Ministries – For more information, please contact your local Division.

January 19: Religious Liberty Day- For more information, please contact the General Conference Department of Public Affairs and Religious Liberty.

February 2019

February 2: Reach the World: Personal Outreach – For more information, please contact the General Conference Department of Sabbath School and Personal Ministries.

February 9–16: Christian Home and Marriage Week – For more information, please contact the General Conference Department of Family Ministries.

March 2019

March 2: Women’s Day of Prayer – For more information, please contact the General Conference Department of Woman’s Ministries.

March 9: Adventist World Radio – For more information, please contact Adventist World Radio.

March 16–23: Youth Week of Prayer – For more information, please contact the General Conference Department of Youth Ministries.

March 16: Global Youth Day – For more information, please see the Global Youth Day website.

March 16: Global Children’s Day – For more information, please see the General Children’s Ministries website. (Download the brochure)

March 23: Christian Education – For more information, please contact your local Division.

April 2019

April 6: Day of Fasting and Prayer – For more information, view these resources from General Conference Ministerial Association.

April 6: Youth Spiritual Commitment Celebration (Northern Hemisphere) – For more information, please contact your local Division.

April 13: Friends of Hope Day (Visitor’s Day) – For more information, please contact the General Conference Department of Sabbath School and Personal Ministries.

April 13: Hope Channel – For more information, please contact Hope Channel International.

April 20–26: Literature Evangelism Rally Week – For more information, please contact your local Division.

April 20: World Impact (Distribution) Day – For more information, please contact your local Division.

April 27: Special Needs Awareness Day – For more information, please view this website.

May 2019

May 4–25: Drug Awareness Month – For more information, please contact the General Conference Department of Health Ministries.

May 4: Reach the World: United by Our Mission – This day has been set aside to share our church’s global strategic plan with the world. Pleaseuse this presentation to share Our Mission with your congregation, institution or communication channel.

May 11: Reach the World: In the Community, Disaster/Famine Relief – For more information, please contact your local Division.

May 25: World Day of Prayer for Children at Risk – For more information, please view this PDF.

June 2019

June 1: Reach the World – Bible Study: Sabbath School and Correspondence Courses – For more information, please view this website General Conference Department of Sabbath School and Personal Ministries.

June 8: Women’s Ministries Emphasis Day – For more information, please contact the General Conference Department of Woman’s Ministries.

June 15: Reach the World – Reach Across: Nurture and Reclaiming – For more information, please contact the General Conference Department of Sabbath School and Personal Ministries.

June 15: Adventist Church World Refugee Sabbath – Downloadable resources available.

July 2019

July 6: Day of Prayer and Fasting – For more information, please visit the resource from Revival and Reformation.

July 13: Mission Promotion – For more information, please contact Adventist Mission.

July 20: Reach the World: Media Ministry – For more information, please contact the General Conference Department of Communication.

July 27: Children’s Sabbath -For more information, please visit the website for Kids in Ministry Ideas.

August 2019

August 3: Global Mission Evangelism – For more information, please contact your local Division.

August 10: Reach the World: Church Planting – For more information, please contact Adventist Mission.

August 17: Education Day – For more information, please contact the General Conference Department of Education.

August 24: enditnow Day – For more information, please contact the General Conference Department of Women’s Ministries.

August 24: Lay Evangelism – For more information, please contact your local Division.

September 2019

September 7: Youth Spiritual Commitment Celebration (Southern Hemisphere) – For more information, please contact your local Division.

September 8–14: Family Togetherness Week – For more information, please see the resources available from theGeneral Conference Department of Family Ministries.

September 14: Mission Promotion – For more information, please contact Adventist Mission.

September 21: Pathfinder Day – For more information, please download this PDF.

September 28: Sabbath School Guest Day – For more information, please contact your local Division.

October 2019

October 5: Day of Prayer and Fasting – For more information, find more resources at Revival and Reformation.

October 5: Adventist Review Subscription Promotion – Adventist Review Subscription Promotion – For more information, please contact the Adventist Review.

October 12: Pastor Appreciation Day – For more information, visit the Elder’s Digest website.

October 19: Spirit of Prophecy and Adventist Heritage – For more information, please view the Ellen G. White Estate website.

October 18–20: Global Public Campus Ministries Weekend – For more information, visit General Conference Public Campus Ministries website.

October 26: Creation Sabbath – For more information, please view theCreation Sabbath website.

November 2019

November 2–9: Week of Prayer – For more information, please view the Adventist Review readings (PDF).

November 9–15: e-Week of Prayer for Youth and Young Adults – For more information, please contact the General Conference Department of Youth Ministries.

November 9: Annual Sacrifice Offering – For more information, please contact Adventist Mission. (Resources)

November 16: World Orphans/Vulnerable Children’s Day – For more information, please contact the Special Needs Ministries.

November 30: HIV/AIDS Awareness – For more information, please contact Adventist AIDS International Ministry.

December 2019

December 7: Stewardship – For more information, please contact your local Division.

December 14: Health Emphasis – For more information, please contact your local Division.

ADRA officially opens first water kiosk in Mozambique

ADRA officially opens first water kiosk in Mozambique

The Adventist Development and Relief Agency (ADRA) officially launched on June 12 its first safe water kiosk in Mocuba, Mozambique, which will provide 20 liters a day of safe water for more than 1,000 people. Mocuba, a district of the Zambezia province in Mozambique, has suffered from inadequate safe water supply for years, but the prolonged drought conditions in Southern Africa has made the situation far worse.

More than 100 people attended the grand opening of the new water kiosk, including Mocuba’s mayor, Beatriz Gulamo, a proud supporter of the community project. “We are very pleased to receive this kiosk. To the entire municipality, this is of great value,” says Gulamo while getting a tour of the new water system. The mayor and several ADRA Mozambique representatives held a ribbon-cutting ceremony and announced that the use of the kiosk is now available.

“Though water vending is not new, ADRA’s water kiosk approach is unique because it is a self-sustaining business model that in addition, distributes safe drinking water,” explained Jason Brooks, senior technical advisor for WASH at ADRA International. “The approach of simply drilling wells and training the community to repair them had to give way to a more sustainable service for larger numbers of people, and ADRA wants to provide the most cost effective and long-lasting water service that will not break down for lack of funds to repair them. With a 15-year presence already established in Mocuba and a great need for safe water, ADRA selected the neighborhood of 6,000 as the first launching point to install the water kiosk.”

Brooks further emphasized that the kiosk is a means to help the community gain access to safe water, and eventually a project that can be maintained by the community. “The residents are the one who will benefit from the kiosk, but ADRA wants to ensure they can take care of the kiosk and sustain the water source so the community receives safe water for a long time,” he says. ADRA will train community members and will help them eventually establish ownership of the kiosk.

The newly implemented kiosk contains numerous features: solar panels atop the kiosk that pumps water automatically from the source to an elevated holding tank, multiple water taps compared to the traditional hand pump allowing faster time for people to receive water, two video monitors for bystanders promoting sanitation and hygiene information to prevent the spread of diseases, ice dispensers, clothes wash and recycling capabilities, and cell phone chargers allowing users at the same time to buy cellphone credits.

Residents would be able to purchase soap, toothbrushes, and feminine products to encourage better hygiene practices, and purchases are managed on a tablet handled by a kiosk attendant. The attendant would also be on site to help monitor the water taps.

ADRA has received full backing from supporters, including the General Conference Adventist Health Ministries, who contributed $60,000 to the project, and Grundfos, a global pump manufacturer, who provided water pump technology for the kiosk.

“A study was conducted previously in Mocuba to better understand the needs of the community, and the biggest need we found was cleaner and safer water,” Brooks says. “People were very open with us about their needs, and their willingness to be part of the solution. We learned that the community wanted safe treated water and didn’t mind paying small fees for the additional resources that came along with the new water system.”

Prior to the water project, many residents were collecting water from contaminated wells or even the nearby river. “We suffered a lot taking water from the river,” commented Mariam Laziza, a mother and resident of Mocuba.

The water was unsafe and tainted from people bathing in the river or washing clothes according to community members. “This is a great relief because with this borehole, the people of CFM will suffer less diseases. We are thankful to ADRA,” says Santos Jose, Mocuba’s community leader. “The water system represents an innovation for ADRA that will replace the type of interventions ADRA had in water supply and well drilling,” adds Armindo Salato, programs director of ADRA Mozambique.

Now, with the installment of the new water kiosk, anyone could fetch gallons of safe water at their leisure in a safer environment. The kiosk is located near the community’s school and in a public setting.

“ADRA wants to be at the forefront of responding to pressing needs for basic essentials such as water,” said Brooks, “We plan to run two to three other kiosks in other locations, but this is a pilot that we will test out for a while before we can do so.”

Pathfinder Honour: Arts Crafts & Hobbies (F-L)

Pathfinder Honour: Arts Crafts & Hobbies (F-L)

Felt Craft

  • Skill Level: 1
  • Original Honor: 1956
  • Originating Institution: General Conference

Requirements:

  1. From what fiber is felt made? What gives it its tensile strength?
  2. List 15 uses of felt.
  3. Give three reasons why felt is a good material for handicrafts.
  4. List the essential steps in felt manufacture.
  5. Make two of the following, using at least two different colors of felt:
  • a. Pennant
  • b. Bookmark
  • c. Refrigerator magnet
  • d. Needle case
  • e. Similar item

6. Make one of the following, using at least four different colors of felt:

  • a. Small wall mural
  • b. Holiday decoration
  • c. Hand puppet
  • d. Kitchen knick-knack

7. Make one of the following, using sewing:

  • a. Stuffed animal
  • b. Stuffed toy
  • c. Tote bag
  • d. Bean bag

Flower Arrangement

  • Skill Level: 2
  • Original Honor: 1938
  • Originating Institution: General Conference

Requirements:

  1. Name six perennials and six annuals suitable for indoor flower arrangement.
  2. Name at least three flowers that bloom in the spring or early summer suitable for indoor flower arrangement.
  3. Name at least three flowers that do not keep well when cut, and three that do.
  4. Give six suggestions regarding the cutting of flowers and their aftercare, such as when to cut, how to cut, and how to keep.
  5. At what stage of development should roses, gladioluses, and dahlias be cut?
  6. Give three suggestions on the relation of containers to the flowers used, and three on the relation of arrangement to the room and furnishings.
  7. In flower arrangement, what should be the relation of dark and light shades, large and small flowers, open and partly open flowers?
  8. Make two artistic flower arrangements in each of the following areas: (Fresh or silk flowers may be used.)
  • a. Table decoration
  • b. General house use
  • c. Public service

9. What are some wild flowers that could be used in arrangements for the home? What combinations of these flowers can be used?

Geneology & Advanced

  • Category: Arts, Crafts, and Hobbies
  • Skill Level 2
  • Originating Organization: North American Division

Requirements:

1. Define the following words :

  • a. genealogy
  • b. ancestor
  • c. descendant
  • d. spouse
  • e. sibling

2. Read the genealogy of Christ

  • a. Be able to tell where it is found in the New Testament
  • b. Write out the genealogy of Christ – beginning with Adam

3. List five ways to obtain family genealogy information

4. Know at least three societies that help with genealogy research

5. Learn four steps important to genealogy research

6. What is the purpose of documentation?

7. Define a primary source versus a secondary source for documentation.

8. Prepare a four-generation family chart – beginning with your self

9. List ways to record your genealogy information

10. Research your family history by talking/writing to your oldest living relative

Ask the following:

  • a. first memory
  • b. When and where you were born?
  • c. First church you remember attending?
  • d. Names of schools, and location, you attended
  • e. Where you lived at age ten and age fourteen
  • f. From what country did our ancestors emigrate?
  • g. Where and when were you married
  • h. If you had children please give their names, place and date of birth
  • i. Write a thank you to your relative for their time and include a photo of yourself and ask them if they would be willing to share a copy of an older family photo with you.

11. Make a historical record of your life including:

  • a. genealogical chart
  • b. Records that pertain to your life
  • c. Pictures
  • d. Stories
  • e. Share this with your group/club/school

12. Visit a City/County Library – Genealogy Section (or other Genealogy Research Center) and write a paragraph on your visit including:

  • a. Types of information available
  • b. Any New information you discovered about your family

13. Visit a cemetery and learn by copying the headstones:

  • a. The names of three different families
  • b. The dates of birth and death for these family members
  • c. The average length of life for these family members

14. Check with your local cemetery officials to learn how upkeep is done and ask them how you can help with clean-up in a cemetery in your area. Then do it!

  • Category: Arts, Crafts, and Hobbies
  • Skill Level: 3
  • Original Honor: 2006
  • Originating Institution: North American Division

Advanced Requirements:

  1. Have the Genealogy Honor
  2. Define a primary source versus a secondary source for documentation.
  3. What is the purpose of documentation?
  4. Demonstrate a census extraction for one branch of your family from six of the following census: (for NAD find year of immigration and list the country from where they immigrated)
  • a. 1840
  • b. 1850
  • c. 1860
  • d. 1870
  • e. 1880
  • f. 1900
  • g. 1910
  • h. 1920

5. Show a pedigree chart you have filled out for 7 generations. List the information you have been unable to learn and what efforts you have made to locate this information.

6. Show 42 family group records you have filed out and the documentation notes to go with the family group record.

7. Find military records/pension records on one of your family members. If your family has none, then show military/pension records on any person.

8. Show vital records you have obtained for one person from item # 5 including:

  • a. birth
  • b. marriage
  • c. death

9. Show a copy of 3 obituaries on relatives with documentation where you found them.

10. List four web sites/or libraries where you have been able to locate information for your family research.

11. Where in the Bible does it say not to spend time on fables and endless genealogies? What does the Seventh-day Adventist Commentary list as the reason

for this advice?

Gift Wrapping

  • Skill Level: 1
  • Original Honor: 2015
  • Originating Institution: Euro-Asia Division

Requirements:

1. List five courtesy rules for giving and receiving gifts.
2. Do the following:

  • a. Collect different types of wrapping paper, at least ten grades, five-by-seven centimeters in size.
  • b. Choose a suitable gift wrap pattern for wrapping a gift to a child, an adult, a sister, a brother, etc.
  • c. Demonstrate carefully wrapping a simple rectangular box in paper.

3. Wrap the following types of gifts with ornamental supplement:

  • a. in the form of a cube
  • b. in the form of a cylinder
  • c. multifaceted
  • d. extraordinary (your option).

4. Know how to make a gift bow (3 types).
5. Correctly and carefully pack a gift. Give the wrapped gift to someone in your family, church, or community

Glass Craft

 

  • Original Honor: 1970
  • Originating Institution: General Conference

Requirements:

  1. Name ten kinds of glass.
  2. Know what kind of glass is used for furniture, cloth insulation, airplanes, and automobiles.
  3. Prepare at least three colors of glass for picture making.
  4. Know the steps in making a picture with glass, and complete such a picture, using at least three colors.
  5. Write a 300-word report or give a three-minute oral report on the history of glass and how glass is made.

Glass Etching

 

  • Skill Level: 1
  • riginal Honor: 1997
  • Originating Institution: General Conference

Requirements:

  1. Name the tools and items needed for Glass Etching.
  2. Name the eleven steps of Glass Etching.
  3. What is the technique of applying velvet etch?
  4. Make a project on clear glass.
  • a. Lettering or verses
  • b. Flowers, animals, or people.

5. Make a project on a mirror. Include the following:

  • a. Lettering, verses, flowers, animals, or people.
  • b. Finish by framing around mirror with colored tape.
    6. Make a project on a glass, jar, or oval object.

Glass Painting

  • Skill Level: 1
  • Original Honor: 1938
  • Originating Institution: General Conference

Requirements:

  1. Know the primary colors, the secondary colors, and how to mix the primary colors to obtain the secondary colors.
  2. Know the materials used in painting, mounting, and hanging a glass painting.
  3. Make and display a glass painting for each of the following designs: animal, flower, and landscape or seascape.
  4. Make a silhouette painting and mount for hanging.
  5. Make a hand-painted mirror picture by removing the back coating of the mirror from the picture area and painting the design on the back of the mirror glass.

Guitar

  • Skill Level: 2
  • riginal Honor: 2012
  • Originating Institution: South America Division / North American Division

Requirements:

  • Research the history of guitars and how they came to your country.
  • Describe or show the difference between melody, harmony and rhythm.
  • Distinguish three different types of guitars. Describe the advantages and disadvantages of each type.
  • Identify the three divisions of the guitar and identify 15 different parts, explaining the function of each part.
  • Demonstrate the correct posture to practice guitar. Explain the importance of practicing in that position.
  • Know the names of the fingers, strings and hand positions. Demonstrate each in its proper way.
  • In standard tuning, the 6 strings on a guitar are associated with which notes?
  • What are the chords (figures) and how are they built? Write by memory a list of all major and minor chords, along with specific finger positions.
  • Demonstrate ability to perform at least seven major and minor chords (ex. A, B, B7, C, D, E, G, F, A minor).
  • Explain the difference between flats and sharps? Show how they are represented for guitar play.
  • Describe the difference between nylon and steel stringing, and explain the reason behind your preference.
  • Demonstrate the use of a capo and how to replace a guitar string.
  • Play a song using at least two different techniques:
  • Strumming
  • Fingerpicking
  • Classical
    Other
    Select three simple hymns or spiritual songs that you can play on guitar, and teach them to a unit, club or group.

Guitar, Advanced

  • Skill Level: 3
  • Original Honor: 2012
  • Originating Institution: South American and North American Divisions

Requirements:

  1. Have the Guitar honor.
  2. Define “Triads” and show how are they used. Demonstrate how to play triads derived from high score notes.
  3. Demonstrate two different methods of guitar tuning.
  4. Define tablature (tabs). Demonstrate how to read and perform tablature (tabs) on a guitar.
  5. Demonstrate how to change the key of a song to fit the vocal range of the singers.
  6. Define and explain the differences between consonant and dissonant chord?
  7. Practice and perform a solo in at least two scales with the guitar.
  8. Create a personal song book of at least 25 hymns and spiritual songs with chords properly written. Play them as part of a song service or performance during a club meeting worship service, worship, or other group function.

Kanzashi

  • Skill Level: 1
  • Original Honor: 2015
  • Originating Institution: Euro-Asia Division

Requirements

  1. Define Kanzashi, or Hana Kanzashi? Where did this art come from? How did it develop?
  2. Describe or show what materials and tools are used in Kanzashi?
  3. Show in what way the round three- or two-dimensional Kanzashi petals can be folded.
  4. Show in what way the narrow three- or two-dimensional Kanzashi petals can be folded.
  5. Show in what way the double round and double narrow Kanzashi petals can be folded.
  6. Make a Kanzashi flower with three-dimensional petals and fashion the back of fabric.
  7. Make a Kanzashi flower with two-dimensional petals and fashion the back of fabric.
  8. Make a finished Kanzashi product (hair-clip, brooch, etc).

Notes:

Kanzashi are woman’s hairpins, hairgrips, and combs, to be worn in hair, in combination with kimono. Kanzashi and kimono are often made in the same style.

The ornaments Hana Kanzashi (Kanzashi with flowers) are featured by silk flowers and threads containing small silk flowers that hang down about 20 cm. A Hana Kanzashi may be worth more than a kimono because making a Hana Kanzashi is a very meticulous work resembling jeweller’s work. Kanzashi are hair ornaments used in traditional Chinese and Japanese hairstyles. Kanzashi came into wide use during the Edo period, when artisans began to produce more finely crafted products. Nowadays, Kanzashi are most often worn by brides; by professional kimono wearers such as tayū and yujo; or by adepts in Japanese tea ceremony and ikebana. However, there is currently a revival among young Japanese women who wish to add an elegant touch to their business suit.

Knitting

  • Skill Level: 2
  • Original Honor: 1970
  • Originating Institution: General Conference

Requirements:

1. Define the following:

  • a. K
  • b. P
  • c. STS
  • d. RND
  • e. TOG
  • f. PSSO
  • g. INC
  • h. DEC
  • i. YO

2. Demonstrate the following:

  • a. Cast on
  • b. Bind off
  • c. Cable stitch
  • d. Ribbing
  • e. Garter stitch
  • f. Stockinette stitch
  • g. Pick up a dropped stitch

3. Know how to care for these kinds of yarn:

  • a. Wool
  • b. Hair
  • c. Synthetic

4. Show how to join on a new ball of yarn.

5. Identify and know the purpose of the following weights of yarn:

  • a. Medium
  • b. Sports
  • c. Heavy
  • d. Bulky

6. Knit two items from the following:

  • a. Slippers
  • b. Mittens
  • c. Baby booties
  • d. Hat
  • e. Scarf
  • f. Sleeveless sweater
  • g. Reasonable choice

Knitting, Advanced

  • Skill Level: 3
  • Original Honor: 1970
  • Originating Institution: General Conference

Requirements:

  1. Have the Knitting Honor.
  2. Knit a pair of argyle or patterned socks, gloves, or some other article, using four needles and yarn bobbins.
  3. Knit an afghan or a baby blanket.
  4. Knit a sweater with long sleeves or a baby set of sweater, bonnet, and booties.

Lapidary

  • Skill Level: 2
  • Original Honor: 1967
  • Originating Institution: North American Division

Requirements:

  1. Name four safety precautions to be taken when sawing rocks.
  2. Name two types of diamond saw lubricating and cooling solutions and their purpose.
  3. Explain how a diamond saw cuts rocks, how it gets dull, and how it can be sharp ened.
  4. Describe the five basic steps to follow in bringing a slab or a flat surface to a polish.
  5. What important precaution should be taken between each stage of grinding and sanding?
  6. What is a template, and how is it used?
  7. What is a cabochon, and what is the usual thickness of the slab from which it is made?
  8. How do you decide the best angle or position to slab a specimen?
  9. Explain two methods of wet sanding while shaping and polishing the rock.
  10. From what material are polishing compounds made? If a scratch appears while polishing, how is it removed?
  11. Saw, trim, properly dop, and carry a cabochon through the necessary grinding, sanding, and polishing stages to a high gloss or glassy finish.
  12. Mount the cabochon on some type of backing, such as a stick pin, sweater pin, key ring, etc., with cement.

Leather Craft

  • Skill Level: 1
  • Original Honor: 1937
  • Originating Institution: General Conference

Requirements:

  1. List the necessary tools a beginner needs in leather craft and demonstrate the proper use of each.
  2. Know how to distinguish different kinds of leather, such as calf, goat, and imitation leather. What leathers are most suitable for tooling?
  3. Give the steps necessary in the preparation of leather.
  4. Transfer a design to leather, and tool and lace some object in leather, such as a billfold, magazine cover, belt, key keeper, or small purse.
  5. Show how to use leather dye.
  6. What kind of finish should be used on leather?

Leather Craft, Advanced

  • Skill Level: 2
  • Original Honor: 1977
  • Originating Institution: General Conference

Requirements:

  1. Have the Leather Craft Honor.
  2. Show how to punch holes, set snaps, do saddle stitching, and do two types of lacing.
  3. Make a sheath for a hatchet, knife, or ax.
  4. Complete a figure-carved belt, doing your own tooling.
  5. From your own design, cut from leather, tool, punch, and lace a project such as a case, purse, bag, or an equivalent.
  6. Show six leather items you have made.

LEGO Design

  • Skill Level: 1
  • Originating Institution: North American Division

Requirements:

1. Know the following terms:

  • A. Element
  • B. Stud
  • C. Brick
  • D. Plate
  • E. Base Plate
  • F. Tile
  • G. Slope
  • H. Inverted Slope
  • I. Hinge
  • J. Technics Brick
  • K. Power Functions
  • L. Mini-figure

2. Build and/or find examples of following types of scale models:

  • A. Micro Scale (1 city block equals 32 studs)
  • B. Mini-figure Scale (6 feet or 2 meters, equals roughly 6 studs)
  • C. Ultimate Collector Scale (larger than Mini-figure Scale and smaller than 1 tot 1 scale)
  • D. 1 to 1 Scale (Actual Size)

3. Choose one of the following:

  • A. Build a 1 to 1 scale model of something from nature, your home, church, or school. Then share your model with your group or club.
  • B. Build a scale model of your house, apartment, or other building in your community. Be sure to include large furniture items like bed, stove, refrigerator, sofa, & dresser, etc. Then share your model with your group or club.

4. Choose one of the following:

  • A. Use LEGO® as visual aid in a Children’s Story for youth ages 2-9 at church or Sabbath School.
  • B. Use LEGO® as part of a school project.

5. Build a scene or an item from the Bible using LEGO® in one of the scale sizes from Requirement #2.

6. From your imagination create your own design in 2 of the 5 categories below and share both designs with your group or club.

  • A. Car, truck, or other land vehicle.
  • B. Plane, helicopter, or other aircraft.
  • C. Ship, submarine, or other watercraft.
  • D. Brick built animal or plant based on a real species using at least 10 pieces.
  • E. Machine, appliance, or robot (without power functions)

7. Write a 250 word paragraph, or in a 3-5 minute presentation to you group or club, tell how you can use LEGO® to witness to those that don’t know about God.

LEGO, the LEGO logo and the minifigure are trademarks and/or copyrights of The LEGO Group. Pathfinders and the Seventh-Day Adventist Church are not affiliated with and/or facilitated by The LEGO Group.

Lettering & Poster Making

  • Skill Level: 2
  • Original Honor: 1933
  • Originating Institution: General Conference

Requirements:

  1. Write from memory the complete lower case alphabet in two of the following: Gothic, Roman, or Italic.
  2. Demonstrate when the different sizes and types of pens are to be used.
  3. State at least four principles in making a poster attractive and distinctive. Know how to make correct margins for the size of paper you are using.
  4. Make three posters in a variety of sizes to be used by any of the following groups: Sabbath School, church, school, Pathfinder Club, or AY Society. Use at least two different types of lettering in these posters.
  5. Make five additional posters on topics of your own choice. These posters will be judged for acceptance on the following three conditions:
  • a. Arrangement
  • b. Neatness
  • c. Selection in type of lettering used.

6. Practice all strokes until they can be done smoothly and accurately.

Lighthouses

  • Skill Level: 1
  • Original Honor: 2007
  • Originating Institution: North American Division

Requirements:

1. Describe the following in detail concerning lighthouses:

  • a. What is the function of a lighthouse?
  • b. When were the first lighthouses of record built?
  • c. What is the name of the most famous ancient lighthouse?
  • d. What are people called who study lighthouses? Why?
  • e. Do all lighthouses have keepers? If not, how are they run?

2. Research the structure and function of Fresnel lenses. Explain what makes these lenses so effective.

3. Throughout history, what fuels were used for lighthouse lights?

4. Are all lighthouses located along ocean shores? If not, list other locations where you would find a lighthouse.

5. What is the lighthouse service called in your country? What organization or branch of government is responsible for maintaining lighthouses in your country?

6. When a lighthouse is a visible landmark seen from the ocean during the day it can be identified by certain markings. What are these called?

7. What is a foghorn? Why would one be used at a lighthouse? What are three things that affect how far away a foghorn can be heard?

8. Since lighthouses are often called “lights”, explore the concept of “lights” in scripture by doing the following:

  • a. Look in the Bible Concordance to find “lights” and discuss lights as referred to in the Bible
  • b. Explain why you think God’s word is like a lighthouse.
  • c. Memorize John 8:12.

9. Write a poem or a story about a lighthouse light. Include thoughts of God’s “light”. Read your story or poem to your group.

10. Draw or photograph five lighthouse forms/types being used today.

11. Do one of the following:

  • a. List the names and locations of 5 lighthouses in your state/province.
  • b. Locate on a map the location of 10 lighthouses in your country/division

12. List the references you used to learn about lighthouses.

Lighthouses, Advanced

  • Skill Level: 3
  • Original Honor: 2007
  • Originating Institution: North American Division

Requirements:

1. Have the Lighthouses Honor

2. Make a scrapbook including the following:

  • a. Pictures, post cards or drawings of twenty-five lighthouses. Label should include a brief description of: location, year built, active/non-active status, and order of the lens.
  • b. Write up a short history of the above lighthouses.
  • c. Include drawings/pictures and answers to all the requirements for this honor in your scrapbook.

3. List the development of a Fresnel lens, including:

  • a. Name of the gentleman that invented it.
  • b. Country that he came from
  • c. Year developed

4. Draw a Fresnel lens:

  • a. Show how prisms are used to concentrate light
  • b. Draw a bull’s eye lens and state its purpose

5. Make a chart showing each class of Fresnel lens:

  • a. Define order and list by size
  • b. Name at least one lighthouse using each order

6. Research and describe the history of the mechanism for rotating lights

7. Make a chart of six lighthouses showing nighttime (light) and daytime (day mark) signature.

8. What is a lightship? Why and where are lightships needed?

9. Read about lighthouse keepers and list some of the hazards they faced in completing their duties.

10. Study quotes by Ellen White mentioning lighthouses and discuss the meaning. Place a copy of the quotes in your scrapbook.

11. Obtain a “Lighthouse Passport” and have it stamped at 10 different lighthouse locations.

12. Build a lighthouse modeled after a real lighthouse using a lighthouse kit, wood, or other medium. Know the name, location, and date when the actual lighthouse was originally built.

 

First Adventist church building inaugurated in Erbil, Iraq

First Adventist church building inaugurated in Erbil, Iraq

The Seventh-day Adventist community inaugurated its first church in Erbil, the capital city of the Iraqi Kurdistan region, on Sunday, February 25. During the first service in the new church building on the Sabbath before, the church members reflected on the past years, the challenges faced and the blessings achieved. On the 25th, the official opening ceremony included local authorities and representatives from the headquarters of the Middle East and North Africa Union.

Gilberto Araujo, director of the East Mediterranean Region that covers Iraq, Lebanon, Jordan, and Syria, expressed his gratitude for the support from the Middle East and North Africa Union (MENA).

“We would like to express its appreciation to the local authorities in Kurdistan for allowing us to freely and peacefully worship,” said Araujo. “At the same time, we thank MENA for its financial help and leadership.”

Local authorities congratulated the Seventh-day Adventist community on the dedication of the new church at the inauguration ceremony.

“Dozens of churches were opened in Kurdistan Region, showing the coexistence of different nations and religions in the region,” said Pshtiwan Sadiq, acting minister of Endowment and Religious Affairs.

Church leaders encouraged the members to share God’s hope and love with the community in spite of the sufferings they have endured.

“This inauguration shows that there is a future for the gospel in the country,” said Tibor Szilvasi, executive secretary of the Middle East and North Africa Union.

It was a memorable day for the members of the Adventist church in Iraq, which had been much stronger in the past until many conflicts happened in the region and the church’s presence became weak in the country.
The Beginning in Iraq

In 1923, Adventist gospel workers began their work in the city of Mosul, 250 mi (400km) north of Bagdad. Later Adventist schools and a hospital were built in the city.

In 1958, the first Adventist church in Iraq was opened in Baghdad, the capital city of Iraq. During the peak of the Adventist presence in the country, there were four churches in the cities of Mosul, Baghdad, Kirkuk and Basrah with a total membership of nearly 200 people.
Political Upheavals

In the 1970s, although the government nationalized Adventist institutions such as schools and a hospital, Iraqi Adventists still had the freedom to worship so churches were kept open.

However, the country suffered from several wars with Iran from1980 through 1988 and with the United States in 2003. Due to the wars and instability, many members left the country and the church was severely affected.

All the Adventist churches in the country started to close one by one, until the last church in Baghdad had to shut its door and there were no members left.

“It was a really stressful period for the church,” said George Yousif, an Iraqi Adventist member of the Erbil church.
New Beginning and Challenges

In 2011, indigenous and expat Adventists from Bagdad, Nicaragua, and Brazil began to gather together to worship in Erbil. The worshiping group grew in number particularly as the Adventist church’s humanitarian agency, Adventist Development and Relief Agency (ADRA) came to the region to work for refugees and Internally Displaced People(IDP).

In 2015, the church encountered another crisis when military operations started against the Islamic State (ISIS) in the city of Mosul, 51mi (81km) west of Erbil. However, the crisis didn’t stop church members from worshiping together.
Next Steps

With the new building, the church can receive more people than before and it is planning various projects to serve the community members.

Rick McEdward, president of the church’s regional headquarters in Beirut, Lebanon, believes that being a light in the community should be the main focus of the new facility.

“As Adventists we are called to bring hope to the world, after years of years of crisis it is a great moment to see a new church opened to serve the community,” said McEdward. “We are grateful to God for the freedom to open a place of prayer and service in order to bring God’s love to the world.”

Adventists among first to respond to Papua New Guinea earthquake

Adventists among first to respond to Papua New Guinea earthquake

Seventh-day Adventists were among the first to respond after a powerful earthquake devastated villages in Papua New Guinea (PNG).

The 7.5 magnitude quake struck the Southern Highlands region of PNG on February 26, with 122 reported deaths. Since then there has been a series of at least 70 aftershocks.

An initial report from oil and gas company ExxonMobil listed the Adventist Development and Relief Agency (ADRA) as part of the initial assessment team that made one of the first visits to the area.

“Anticipating immediate resource needs, the team delivered essentials, including shelter equipment, water and sanitation support to the Para Health Clinic, which serves the Para, Tokaju and Hides areas,” a media release from the company stated.

Adventist Aviation Services (AAS) in Goroka also posted an update to their Facebook page, outlining the details of their involvement in providing aid.

“The Seventh-day Adventist Church in Papua New Guinea, through its flying program, Adventist Aviation Services PNG, has had the incredible opportunity to be a first responder . . . to the people of PNG most devastated by the earthquake,” the March 6 post said.

“On Thursday, as it became apparent that relief from other sources would not be available for some time, and as our aircraft and crew became available for duty, AAS CEO Captain Jeff Downs began coordinating with Mission Aviation Fellowship International to clearly identify the rural communities most affected by the earthquake.

“By Friday morning, Captain Downs and AAS flight coordinator Samson Nopi were able to purchase more than 13,000 Kina worth of rice, tinned fish and water and, over Friday and Saturday, delivered 850kg of food and water to villages in need.”

In the impacted area—one of the most remote locations in PNG—up to 80 per cent of the houses have been destroyed, along with roads and other infrastructure.

A report prepared by ADRA PNG emergency coordinator Willie Kunsei said about 143,000 people have been identified as needing urgent humanitarian assistance.

“The people requiring urgent assistance also face the immediate risk of displacement and will have lost most of their assets with short- and long-term consequences to their lives and livelihoods,” noted Mr Kunsei.

Food is scarce, with 64,000 people at risk of extreme food insecurity. Most gardens were destroyed by the landslides and, in some cases, totally covered by landslides.

As aftershocks continue to hit the Highlands, the PNG Government is relying on foreign aid to get relief to the affected areas. ADRA and AAS in PNG will continue monitoring the situation, and working with the Government and other agencies to provide support to affected villages.

“Please, Church family around the world, pray for your Seventh-day Adventist friends and the people of the Papua New Guinea Highlands,” said the communication team from the Western Highlands Mission.